Water Makes Us Wet, a film by Beth Stephens & Annie Sprinkle

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unnamedYou’re invited to the Santa Cruz Film Festival’s “test screening” of Water Makes Us Wet! An Ecosexual Adventure, Beth Stephens & Annie Sprinkle’s newest film happening October 15, 2017 at the Tannery Arts Center’s Colligan Theater 1010 River Street, Santa Cruz, CA

Join Beth & Annie, cast & crew LIVE, for discussion after the movie.

Water Makes Us Wet! An Ecosexual Adventure With Sandy Stone as the Earth is a poetic blend of curiosity, humor, sensuality, and concern, that chronicles the pleasure and politics of H20 from an ecosexual perspective.

Travel with UCSC professor/artist Beth, and former sex worker/artist Annie Sprinkle, and their dog Butch as they interact with a diverse range of folks including biologists, white water rafters, activists, water treatment plant workers, scholars, a tarot reader, doggie detective, flamboyant performance artists, and others.  The adventure climaxes with a shocking event that reaffirms the power of water, life and love.  

Guaranteed not to be a dry environmental documentary!

Tickets available at Brown Paper Tickets.

To hear our radio interview, click on the play button below:

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Smith Renaissance Society

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21761510_1719242668140509_7134149134421266908_nOn Wednesday, October 11, 2017, former President of the Smith Renaissance Society, Shawn Cervantes came into the KZSC Radio Station to talk about the organization and the current exhibition at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History “Lost Childhoods,” about California foster youth, and an opportunity to spend time with the creators of this powerful exhibit, including current and former foster youth, Smith Society students, and artists and advocates. Shawn brought with her a former Smith Fellow, Bonnie Bea, and current “Smithie”, Jack.

The mission of the Smith Renaissance Society is to create a cross-generational community that provides academic, personal, social and financial support to UCSC students who lack the traditional family support afforded to most of their peers. Typically, these students have multiple adverse childhood experiences including, but not limited to, neglect, abuse, abandonment, or homelessness. Students may identify as being current or former foster youth, wards of the court, runaways, orphans, children of incarcerated parents, or children of parents with severe mental illness.

To hear our interview, please click on the play button below:

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What is Lost When a Species Goes Extinct?

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Within the question, “what is lost when a species goes extinct?”, is embedded another question, “how do we talk about it?” To investigate these questions and more, Irena Polic, Managing Director of the Institute for Humanities Research, brought Claudio Campagna, Adjunct Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Daniel Guevara, Chair and Associate Professor, Philosophy Department, all at UCSC, onto KZSC‘S Artists on Art Radio Program, April 4, 2017.

We began the discussion about the new research group, The Language of Conservation, and their inaugural event, What is Lost When A Species Goes Extinct? A Colloquium on the Unspeakable Value of Life, that happened, April 14, in Humanities 1. It was a conversation between a philosopher and three scientists about the impact of language—how particular words and concepts impact the public’s thinking about topics such as “sustainability,” “conservation,” and “extinction.”

Here’s an excerpt of our interview with Claudio Campagna talking about his journey as an animal behaviorist to researching the philosophy of the environmental movement and starting the new IHR research group with Daniel Guevara on language and conservation.

To hear our interview in its entirety, click on the play button below:

Alex Perez reads his poem Pablo Pueblo

Ryan Page

17349580_10155104079201665_1092508686179610993_oEver wonder what is music? That was one of the topics composer and performer, Ryan Page and Nada Miljkovic spoke about when he came onto the KZSC radio show, Artists on Art.  To inform the answer to this question, we played music by John Cage and Pauline Oliveras as well as Ctrl-Z and discussed their similarities and differences.

Ryan Page is a composer, performer, and tinkerer who focuses on human interaction with technology.  In 2015 he founded the live electronic music group Ctrl-Z with Daniel Steffey and Nicholas Wang. Ctrl-Z performs and commissions new electronic works, along with classic works of 20th-Century experimental music. Last year, he started a record label, Cutty Strange Records and is currently working towards his Ph.D. in Film and Digital Media at UCSC.

We discussed Ctrl-Z’s collaboration with Listening to Ladies and their call for composers of any age or nationality who identify as women, nonbinary, or gender fluid are invited to submit scores for live performative electronics for a series of concerts to take place in California and New York in the Fall of 2017 (venues/dates to-be-determined). The program will showcase hugely important yet often overlooked contributions to the history of electronic music by women alongside new pieces written by non-cis-male composers working on the cutting edge of experimental electronic and electroacoustic music. The resulting program will be recorded and released by Ctrl-Z in late 2017/early 2018. Applications are due June 1st, 2017.

To hear our interview, please click on the play button below.

Newton Harrison

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UCSC Professor Emeritus, Newton Harrison is the featured guest on KZSC’s Artists on Art. We discussed his work with Helen Mayer Harrison, the Harrison Studio, the Center for the Study of the Force Majeure, and the event hosted by the UCSC’s Institute of the Arts and Science, CELEBRATING HELEN AND NEWTON HARRISON – 45 YEARS OF ECOLOGICAL ART, happening, Thursday, March 9, 2017, in the Digital Arts Research Center. This event is free and open to the public.

The Harrisons have worked for almost forty years with biologists, ecologists, architects, urban planners and other artists to initiate collaborative dialogues to uncover ideas and solutions which support biodiversity and community development. Their most recent project is the Force Majeure.

Based at UCSC, The Center for the Study of the Force Majeure brings together artists and scientists to design ecosystem-adaptation projects in critical regions around the world to respond to climate change.

To hear our interview, please press the play button below:

Greg O’Malley

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Our monthly show featuring Irena Polic, Managing Director of the Institute for Humanities Research continued in March. Irena brought onto the show UCSC Associate Professor of History, Gregory O’Malley, who is a UCSC Faculty Participants in the IHR World History Research Cluster that focuses on new research in the world and transnational history.

We talked about Greg’s book, Final Passages: The Intercolonial oMalley_final_PBSlave Trade of British America, 1619-1807, that examines the dispersal of African captives throughout the Americas after their initial arrival from Africa and redraws the map of the forced African immigration during the slave trade era. Building on the scholarship of the Atlantic slave trade and the material in Voyages: A Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, he extends the study of the Atlantic slave trade to what he terms ‘‘final passages’’: the voyages of the intercolonial and intra-American slave trade. 

Now with the help of a $220,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a project titled Final Passages: The Intra-American Slave Trade Database, O’Malley is creating an interactive, free Web-based database about the slave trade within the Americas that will be integrated into the Voyages site.

“I think what drew me to the colonial period was an interest in race relations as a core dilemma of American society,” O’Malley observed. “We are living in a country where black lives are often treated as if they didn’t matter, and it’s built on this trade of slaves,” O’Malley added. “This disregard for their welfare and well-being is really important background for modern race relations. I think it shows we have a long history of devaluing black lives in American society.”

To hear our interview, please click on the play button below. 

Activism in Santa Cruz County

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The Artists on Art show for January 18th, 2017, featured spiritual activist and author, Ami Chen, community activist Miriam Stombler and Didje Koffa to talk about the protests happening in Santa Cruz County in response to the inauguration of the 45th President of the United States.

On inauguration night, the eve before the Women’s March, we are having a peaceful gathering to affirm our core values as friends, family, neighbors, and community. Come and hear inspirational speakers, light a candle (or bring a flashlight), and sing songs of solidarity.

This is a family and kid-friendly event. Bring an umbrella and dress warm! We stand together – rain or shine!

Our program begins at 5:30pm with Candlelighting, candles will be provided, but feel free to bring a flashlight (weather may not be conducive for candles!)

Our moderator is Lani Bandhauer who will welcome speakers: Santa Cruz County Supervisor John Leopold, Brenda Griffin of the NAACP and activist, educator, and author Bettina Aptheker. Music and Poetry will be provided by Djide Koffa and Simone Cox.

This event is sponsored by Women United California. #unitetoignite

 To hear our interview in its entirety please click on the play button below.

Cid Pearlman & Collette Kollewe

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Dancers & Choreographers Cid Pearlman and Collette Kollewe came into KZSC to talk about the newest CID PEARLMAN PERFORMANCE, Economies of Effort: 3 at the Felix Kulpa Gallery in Santa Cruz.

The Show dates are March 17-20 & March 24-27, 7:30 & 9:30pm.

It’s free admission and reservations suggested and entry is limited to 35 people per performance.
Go to cidpearlman.org to reserve your spot.

To hear our interview, press the play button below.

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Margaret Niven

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Untitled (El Salvador 5083) 2007″ archival pigment print by David Pace.

Visual Artist and Educator, Margaret Niven, came into UCSC’s KZSC to talk about curating the upcoming  Radius Gallery Exhibition, RAIN PERCUSSIONS.

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What Happens When It Doesn’t Rain (detail floor) 2015 Transformed Plastic Packaging Materials, Wire, Chalk dimensions variable by Renee Charriere

During the show, we spoke by phone on the participating artists, with Reenie Charriere.  Her piece for the show involves found plastic filled with water.

RAIN PERCUSSIONS runs March 23- May 8, 2016, at the Tannery Arts Center, 1050 River St, Unit 127, Santa Cruz, California.

Click on the play button below to hear our interview.

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